Integrating Theory and Practice: Meaningful Technology-Mediated Assignments for Real-World Learning

Here is information on the panel I will be participating in at CSWE. It is called: Integrating Theory and Practice: Meaningful Technology-Mediated Assignments for Real-World Learning. 

  
To get there, follow directions to the fitness center. It is NOT accessible by easy to find elevators in the Tower building. I found it by going to the main lobby and going outside. Look for the soup place across the street, and go to the door to the right:

  
The entrance is directly below the walking concourse. Here is the door with people walking through it:

  

Once inside, go to the fitness center:

  

Take these escalators down a level. Then take the next escalator down a level. Vail is around the corner! 
  

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Client Confidentiality in the Age of Social Media

I had the pleasure of presenting at Community Services of Greater Brockton on March 4, 2015 to talk about client confidentiality in the age of social media. My colleague, Melanie Sage, has done related work and graciously allowed me to repost her related infographic. Here are some talking points from the Brockton presentation.

General Talking Points:

  • It is not a matter of if we use technology, it is a matter of how we use technology
  • Social worker voices tend to be missing from conversations and decisions about tech
  • Confusion and fear about how to proceed with technology in practice drives avoidance not solutions
    • This does a disservice to our clients, who may expect practitioners and services to meet them where they are with technology
  • We run the risk of being culturally incompetent with clients
    • How can we practice effectively if we don’t understand significant aspects of client’s lives, and this includes technology?

Social Media:

  • Social media allows us to have asynchronous, non-geographically bound conversations, interactions, and connections with others
  • These interactions can reach more people than ever before, and typically publicly archived
  • We can advertise our services, provide the most up to date information for clients, and share research findings related to our practice, etc.
  • Social media presents opportunities and challenges for social workers
  • To avoid or lessen complications, develop a social media policy

In terms of confidentiality, the following guidelines from the Online Therapy Institute Ethical Framework for the Use of Social Media by Mental Health Professionals are helpful:

  • Be upfront about appropriate methods of contact (i.e., text messages, email, public messaging)
  • Provide the best level of protection for client data
  • Recognize client concerns and be upfront about the challenges and risks involved with security and privacy. For example, if you email me I may have no control if my account is hacked, but here is how I protect your information as much as possible and what I will do if there is a problem. (Source).
  • Not discuss confidential information on social media
  • Be upfront about avoiding dual relationships on social media
    • Have a policy in place if a client discovers on social media mutual friends, interests, or cultural groups with you. For example, I do not friend or follow current students on social media. If students find me, I welcome their conversation and dialogue, and questions.
  • Do not ask for reviews on consumer review sites, and do not respond on consumer reviews in any way confirming whether someone is or was a therapy client

References:

domesticshelters.org Launches to Help Millions of Abuse Victims Find Help Faster, Easier Than Before

Its_LiveThis is an amazing resource! Please consider helping to spread the word:

Site Launches to Help Millions of Abuse Victims Find Help Faster, Easier Than Before | DomesticShelters.

First Online Searchable Domestic Violence Provider Database in U.S.

August 26, 2014

Online you’ll find plenty of information about domestic violence. That’s not a problem. What is a challenge is trying to find the right help quickly and easily. Search results often reveal disparate shelter sites, help blogs, opportunistic ad-driven sites with outdated data, and paid placements by attorneys. The new website domesticshelters.org is changing this reality by providing consumers the first online searchable domestic violence provider database.

“The great news is that there are many good people, organizations and providers trying to help, and in fact, helping,” said Sylvia Torralba, membership director for the National Coalition of Domestic Violence (NCADV) which has partnered with Theresa’s Fund to develop and launch the site. “What we’re doing is aggregating an ocean of information into a single place.”

More than just aggregating information, the organizers of domesticshelters.org tirelessly spent six months unearthing and identifying 3,001 domestic violence provider organizations in the U.S., and then gathering up to 156 data points on each.

The result is the largest database of its kind ever created, and importantly, the ability for domesticshelters.org language and service preferences, and with a single mouse click, instantly see the most proximate, relevant opportunities for help.

“If you conduct a search in this area, you’ll often not find all of the local providers listed on page one. Some providers don’t even have a web presence,” said Chris McMurry, a marketing and technology entrepreneur and director of Theresa’s Fund, who notes that the overwhelming majority of consumers begin their decision making process with an online search.

“We will be fixing that by moving the exploration of the provider community to the forefront of search results, and then by presenting visitors of domesticshelters.org with standardized data on the providers that allows people to make comparisons and more educated decisions.”

Generally speaking, for each provider there will be contact information excepting confidential locations, languages spoken, populations and geographies served, hours of operation, vacancy rates, and detail on 46 different types of services that may be offered.

Importantly, provider organizations will be able to self-administer their organization’s profile on the website, updating fundamental information as it evolves and adding custom content to enhance the comprehensiveness and attractiveness of their operation and offerings.

According to Google more than 3,000,000 searches are conducted per month for information related to domestic violence, and most often related to seeking help.

The website will be optimized for smartphone and tablet use, recognizing that consumers are increasingly using their devices to conduct searches. Indeed, the number of local mobile searches is expected to exceed desktop searches by 2015, according to eMarketer.

“With some 36,000,000 million searches a year in just the U.S. on the topic of domestic violence, domesticshelters.org is an overdue and much-needed concept that may help more people than any other service ever offered in this space, and may help save lives because it will be so easy, accessible and fast to use,” added Torralba.

The website will also publish and supply helpful information about domestic violence, in addition to the provider database. Providers will be able to gain access to the entire database behind the website in order to better coordinate inter-agency referrals and services.

About NCADV

The survivor led and survivor focused National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) has worked for more than thirty-five years to end violence against women by raising awareness and educating the public about the effects of domestic abuse. Our work includes developing and sustaining ground-breaking public policy at the national level aimed at ending violence; assisting the 2,000+ urban and rural shelters and programs at the local, state, and regional levels of the nation in the programming they offer to victims seeking safety and assistance; and offering programming that empowers and supports the long-term health and safety of victims of domestic violence. Currently, our constituency encompasses more than 80,000 programs, survivors, advocates, and allied individuals and is growing daily. Learn more about us at: www.ncadv.org.

About Theresa’s Fund

Theresa’s Fund is a private family foundation started in 1992 by Preston V. McMurry, Jr. that has helped to change the landscape of domestic violence services in Arizona through grant making, board development and fundraising that has helped to generate more than $49 million in donations for Arizona-based organizations such as East Valley Child Crisis Center, Sojourner Center, Florence Crittenden, Emerge, UMOM, and West Valley Child Crisis Center. It developed the domesticshelters.org concept as a way to expand its reach to people across the U.S.

#MacroSW Twitter Chats Start Tonight at 9pm EST!

YOU’RE INVITED!

THIS WEEK: Discussion of the Rothmann Report. As described by Rachel West:

Over the past year I have written often about the findings in the Rothman Report, which you can read below. The report found that macro social work is in trouble. Schools of social work are increasingly cutting out macro focused courses, there are few macro field placements available, and faculty and administration are actively discouraging students from pursuing community practice work.

Following the publication of the report, ACOSA formed a commission that was tasked with expanding on the research in the report and coming up with solutions to the concerns raised. Recently the Congressional Research Institute for Social Work and Policy (CRISP) wrote an article about the Rothman Commision. You can find that article here.

UPDATE:  Read the chat transcript here: View the story “#MacroSW Chat Recap (3/13/14)” on Storify