Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics (JSWVE) Term Paper Contest

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(Editor’s note: I am a copy editor at JSWVE)

The Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics (JSWVE) is sponsoring a term paper contest.

The term papers will be collected by the JSWVE editorial board and judged by a board of professionals not associated with JSWVE. Winning papers will be published in the Fall 2015 issue of the Journal.

Details for the contest are:

  • Must have a central theme of social work values or social work ethics
  • Must be written as an MSW or BSW student (student may have graduated)
  • Must be nominated by a faculty member (the nominating professor’s name will be published)
  • Must follow the general manuscript submission guidelines found at
    http://www.jswve.org/images/PDFs/jswvemanuscriptformat1207.pdf
  • Must be in APA citation style (except NO headers, NO footers, and NO page numbers)
  • Deadline for submission: May 15, 2015
  • Paper must be submitted by email to smarson@nc.rr.com with a copy sent to
    donnadanddennisv@gmail.com
  • Winning term papers will be published in The Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics in the fall
    issues of 2015.
  • Judges will be professionals who are NOT associated with the JSWVE editorial board

Judging criteria will include:

  • Demonstration of Critical Thinking
  • Relevance to Theme of Social Work Values and Ethics
  • Relevance and Interest of Essay to Social Work Students, Practitioners, and/or Academics
  • Coverage of the Topic
  • Use of Relevant, Scholarly Citations
  • Coherence (flow of ideas)
  • Quality of Writing (literary competence, spelling, grammar, organization)
  • Originality (of topic, ideas, and/or arguments)

 

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Back to School Guide for Social Work Students eBook Published!

Update February 2014: Now available in the iBooks store!

Update: We got a wonderful testimonial from a reader!

“As a former admissions director in a school of social work, I spent lots of time looking for resources to best prepare incoming students for their studies and new careers. Years later, I’m delighted to discover this recently-released publication by Linda Grobman and Karen Zgoda. Contained in this book are the kinds of resources I’d tried to assemble for new social workers becoming acclimated to the scholarship and service of the profession. Needless to say, I’ll be sharing this important publication with colleagues and students enrolled in my social work courses.”
— Jeff T. Steen, LCSW, PhD student, adjunct instructor, New York University

The NEW SOCIAL WORKER® Magazine’s Back-to-School Guide for Social Work Students eBook is now available! I’m so excited to share this new eBook with you!

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Here is a word from the Publisher:

If you are a social work student, we have the new guide you need…our “hot off the press” THE NEW SOCIAL WORKER Magazine’s Back-to-School Guide for Social Work Students, edited by Linda Grobman and Karen Zgoda. This e-book is available now in Kindle format at: http://www.amazon.com/WORKER®-Magazines–School-Students-ebook/dp/B00EZAXVJ8/

You can download the e-book in other formats at: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/355823

You can read contributions from:

  • Jonathan Singer, TIP: Go the Distance
  • Erlene Grise-Owens, Traveling Toward a Social Work Degree: 10 Road-Tested Trip-Tips
  • Allan Barsky, TIP: Ask for Honest Feedback
  • Liz Fisher, Nicole Reed, Loran Stough, and Matt Tracey, Making the Most of Field Seminar
  • Kryss Shane, TIP: Get To Know Your Classmates
  • Marian Swindell, 11 Tips for Professional Behavior in the Classroom
  • Addison Cooper, TIP: “So What I Hear You Saying Is…”
  • Ellen Belluomini, TIP: Minimize Distractions to Increase Your Focus and Attention
  • Brad Forenza, TIP: You Can Get Clinical Licensure With a Macro Concentration
  • Mozart Guerrier, TIP: Focus on Your Purpose and Imagine Your Perfect World
  • Karen Allen, What Is an Ethical Dilemma?
  • Sonya Hunte, TIP: Build Authentic Relationships
  • Kathy Black, Considerations in Writing a Literature Review
  • Dorlee M., TIP: Got Therapy? We All Have Wounds…
  • Stephen Marson, TIP: When in Crisis, See Your Advisor
  • Denice Goodrich Liley, TIP: If I Could Do This Over
  • Jerry Finn, To Once and Future Research Students
  • Mike Langlois, TIP: Change the World
  • Jeff Baxter, What I Have Learned About Learning
  • Ogden Rogers, TIP: Get the Ticket—Take the Ride!
  • And yours truly 🙂
    • SW 2.0: How to Communicate Effectively With Your Professor
    • Back to School Resolution: Avoid Common APA Mistakes
    • (Ctrl + C) + (Ctrl + V) = Homework NOT Finished

The photos on the cover are from my dissertation stream on Instagram.

Please share and help spread the word to all social work students. Hope you enjoy this new guide and find it helpful. Have a great semester!

SW 2.0: Going Where the Client Is: Exploring Virtual Clinical Social Work Practice

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Folks, the next SW 2.0 column for The New Social Worker Magazine is ready! You can read it at the links below:
http://www.socialworker.com/home/Feature_Articles/Technology/SW_2.0%3A_Going_Where_the_Client_Is%3A_Exploring_Virtual_Clinical_Social_Work_Practice/
If you prefer, you can download the full magazine issue here.

This article profiles the amazing virtual clinical practice work of Nancy Smyth, Mike Langlois, DeeAnna Nagel, and Kate Anthony.The article also has many additional resources if you would like to explore virtual clinical social work practice.

I should also note that it is with a heavy heart that I bid farewell to writing the SW 2.0 column regularly. Unfortunately, I am not able to write the column on a regular basis while wrapping up my dissertation at the same time. I will still write about technology for The New Social Worker as time permits, and will blog about technology and social work at http://www.karenzgoda.org. I hope the column helped you think about integrating technology into your practice in new ways and explore the possibilities these technologies extend. I strongly believe it to be at the heart of innovative social work practice in the future, and look forward to seeing your contribution to the field. Although we won’t get to hang out via the column as often as we’d like, Linda and I are brainstorming ways to continue to provide this information, so stay tuned. Keep pushing the envelope, trying new ideas, reaching out and connecting with one another, and learning new ways to connect with clients and help them help themselves on their journey. It has been my pleasure to interact with you and explore how social workers can use technology better. Learning new things helps us grow and develop as a profession and as professionals, and a proactive attitude toward innovative practice will ensure that we are doing everything we can to help the clients we care about so much.

Next SW 2.0 Column Ready! I Want You To Be Part of This Experience: Kickstarter

Folks, my next SW 2.0 column for The New Social Worker can be found at the link below:

I Want You To Be Part of This Experience: Kickstarter

This article focuses on how two different arts projects are using a site called Kickstarter to help spread project awareness, connect with others, and raise funds. Here’s an excerpt:

Don’t you want to know what happens in this movie? Titled Mother’s Red Dress, this film is a:

…tragic love story about a young man suffering from amnesia who’s trying to piece together the past after seeing his mother kill her abusive boyfriend. He leaves home and moves to a small town in Southern California where he meets a young woman who inspires him to rebuild his life with her. All is going well until he receives a call from his mother who says she is dying of cancer and wants to see him one last time. She offers to reunite her son with his father who abandoned them years ago—his father wanting to convince his son that he is a changed man. He returns home, hopeful his mother has changed but finds his past waiting for him in the house where he grew up
. (Official film description,http://www.MothersRedDress.com).

Mother’s Red Dress

The story itself is very personal for John Paul Rice, one of the filmmakers who worked with the director on the script. John was inspired by his mother, herself a survivor of an abusive household, to create a film where family members explore the complex relationships and choices they make when coping with abusive family situations. In John’s words, “Children are trained to love their parents. People make decisions and choices according to their environments. There is always hope that people will change. The film explores the pain of denial that each character faces, yet in the end each makes different choices to cope.”

John hopes that the film will bring to light the damaging effects of denial and help others to face their own experiences and feel hopeful for the future. He and the film’s writer, Edgar Michael Bravo, spoke with many folks and social service organizations with experiences with domestic violence. He was inspired by those who survive and try to thrive despite the trauma. He hopes that others will relate to the characters and have a positive, thoughtful, meaningful reaction, such as taking the best you can from others and giving the best you can of yourself.

Read the rest of the article here. What fun projects have you found on Kickstarter? How might you use it in your practice?

(Ctrl + C) + (Ctrl + V) = Homework NOT Finished

Folks, my next sw 2.0 column for the New Social Worker Online is ready! Here’s an excerpt:

Let’s pretend for a moment that your loved one is in the hospital, suffering and dealing with a crisis and in need of care. Or perhaps you are the one who needs care. How would you feel if you learned that your caretakers hadn’t done all they could to become excellent care providers? Or routinely skipped classes and were now making treatment decisions? How about if these professionals had hired someone else to write their papers or carelessly “Googled it,” missing a valuable opportunity to learn? Can you even imagine what their case notes and paperwork would look like without all that practice writing papers in school? In short, would you trust them to provide high quality care?

It seems there are more and more options these days to use technology to cut corners on assignments, posing a host of ethical problems and concerns about social work practice quality.

Read the whole article here:

Social Work–THE NEW SOCIAL WORKER Online–Magazine for Social Work Students and Recent Graduates–Articles, Jobs, & More – (Ctrl + C) + (Ctrl + V) = Homework NOT Finished.