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Film Review: A Young Man’s Future

July 20, 2016

Watching someone struggle with mental illness is never easy, and even harder when you are in love with the person suffering. This film is about two young men, Jeremy and Scott,  trying to succeed in college while navigating the challenges in forming a romantic relationship with each other and learning how to cope when Scott develops schizophrenia. Watching a loved one slip into deep schizophrenia is particularly challenging on many levels, a process  Jeremy accurately describes as “I feel like I’m going crazy.”  My heart broke many times watching Scott travel deeper and deeper into his illness. Unfortunately these struggles with mental health are all too common, and while untreated mental illness is an avoidable tragedy in this country, this film deftly lays bare the struggles faced by those coming to terms with their mental illness. No Restrictions Entertainment has a reputation for creating unflinching astute portrayals of the human condition in struggle; we get to watch characters make tough, individual choices to cope and persevere, and are reminded that these choices are easier when surrounded by supportive loved ones. Hopefully you walk away thinking about your own choices and are reminded to be supportive of those struggling.

You can find more information about the film on its Facebook page. Side observations: Scott looks like a young Michael Hutchence and has an awesome, rotating collection of funny cooking aprons.

#PulseOrlandoSyllabus, #PulseOrlando & #MacroSW

June 23, 2016

pulse-orlando-header-672x372This post created by Karen Zgoda, Patricia Shelly, MSW, @UBSSW,  and one of my former students Sheri LaBree, MSW. It is cross-posted to reach as many as possible.

Resources: (another resource list – an Orlando Syllabus for Social Workers – is posted below )

#PulseOrlandoSyllabus – Extensive resources crowdsourced and collected by librarians

Park, H. and Mykhyalyshyn, I. 2016 (June 16). L.G.B.T. People Are More Likely to Be Targets of Hate Crimes Than Any Other Minority Group. New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/06/16/us/hate-crimes-against-lgbt.html?_r=1

 

Note: Many tweets about #PulseOrlando use “Latinx” instead of Latina/o. Why?
“The ‘x’ makes Latino, a masculine identifier, gender-neutral. It also moves beyond Latin@ – which has been used in the past to include both masculine and feminine identities – to encompass genders outside of that limiting man-woman binary.
Latinx, pronounced ‘La-teen-ex,’ includes the numerous people of Latin American descent whose gender identities fluctuate along different points of the spectrum, from agender or nonbinary to gender non-conforminggenderqueer and genderfluid.”
http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/our-issues/why-we-say-latinx-trans-gender-non-conforming-people-explain

Here is a Macro Social Work version of an #OrlandoSyllbus. It can help us understand the facts and the complex layers of meaning of the June 12, 2016 massacre at the Pulse nightclub. It includes some implications for social work practice.

Please note the #PulseOrlandoSyllabus,  listed below,  is extensive. It includes current articles, in addition to less recent publications.

 

Intro by Sheri LaBree, MSW:

Much has been written in the media regarding the massacre that took place in Orlando on June 11th. Politicians, pundits and other talking heads have discussed the motives of the attacker, the morals of those that were injured or killed, and of course, they have talked about gun control.

What do we know, nearly two weeks later? Very little. We know that 49 individuals were murdered, and dozens were injured.

The attack occurred at a “gay nightclub.” To me, this label is misleading. Pulse, the nightclub where this occurred, was a sanctuary for the LGBTQ community. It was a safe place. Or at least it was supposed to be.

These people were more than “just” gay. They were sisters, brothers, cousins, coworkers, friends. Like all of us, their lives cannot be neatly divided into labels. The murdered include a social worker, an accountant, a dancer, and an aspiring nurse, among others.

Was this massacre a hate crime against the LGBTQ community? Was it the work of an Islamic terrorist? We may never know. Here’s the question: does it matter? These are people who faced discrimination and obstacles that most of us will never encounter, based solely on their sexual identity. Their lives should be celebrated. They should not be labeled, because they deserve so much more.

The importance of LGBTQ identity is a subject far too big to discuss here. My message is that we should remember the people who were murdered as whole people, with full lives that are multi-faceted and complex.

ORLANDO SYLLABUS FOR SOCIAL WORKERS Compiled by Karen Zgoda and Pat Shelly

Victims:

Syllabi:

General

  • On Orlando and Beyond. (2016).  Danna Bodenheimer. http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/real-world-clinical-sw/on-orlando-and-beyond/
    Excerpt:
    There isn’t much for me to say about Orlando that hasn’t already been said. Most of the debates about the underlying causes of this massacre have happened somewhere in the media or on Facebook. That said, it seems irresponsible and avoidant to write about anything else this week – because, the fact is, even with everything that has already been articulated, we need to keep talking. And talking and talking and talking. And while I have no overarching goal in talking about what happened in Orlando, there are a few points that I would like to make that feel particularly relevant to us as clinical social workers.

Hate Crimes


Latinx

( *6 Articles from #PulseOrlandoSyllabus with focus on LGBTQ, Trans, and people of color:)

Misogyny:

Queer Muslims

Social Work

Motivation

Impact on Children

 Gun Control Policy & Actions

10 Key Steps for Finding & Evaluating Journal Articles for Social Work Research & Literature Reviews

March 28, 2016

Kate-Silfen-e1427300623133-615x575Kate Silfen, Health Sciences Librarian at Mugar Memorial Library at Boston University, and I have put together an infographic to help students find and evaluate  journal articles for social work research and literature reviews. Kate and I had previously worked together on a study published in the Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian journal titled “Evidence-based practice and library instruction: An assessment of student reference lists.” It is our hope that this infographic will provide students with additional guidance as they increase their evidence-based practice skill set. You can find the APA citation for the infographic at the bottom of the image. We would ask that you kindly share the infographic with those who may find it helpful!

View this document on Scribd

Alternate file format:

10KeyStepsforFinding+EvaluatingJournalArticlesforSocialWorkResearch+LiteratureReviews

#MacroSW / #SPSM chat: Suicide Prevention Is A Social Justice Issue | SPSMchat

March 24, 2016

Update: Chat archive now available!

Suicide statistics are often daunting.  According to the Center for Disease Control “There were 41,149 suicides in 2013 in the United States—a rate of 12.6 per 100,000 is equal to 113 suicides each day or one every 13 minutes”.   When you think about this on the global scale The World Health Organization identifies that someone dies by suicide every 40 seconds.

These numbers are quite jarring and demonstrate how important it is to discuss this on a global scale. In the spirit of World Social Work Day and Social Work Month, we want a global conversation around the issue of suicide and social justice. The need to address suicide from the social justice perspective is explored in this TED Talk by Dr. Professor Siobhan O’Neill:

Here is a particularly moving quote: “Suicide is response to unbearable pain, to hopelessness, and feelings of failure and entrapment”

Dr. O’Neill examines the effect on post-traumatic stress and its impact on the health of people in Northern Ireland.  The economic and social determinants in Northern Ireland led to continued poor health outcomes and suicide.  She makes a call to increase connectedness in the community because this connectedness saves lives.

Moving from a local scale to a more global scale, think about how the social work/social justice community can bring about change. In honor of social work month,  please join us and our guest Dr. Siobhan O’Neill  for special global twitter chat about this issue.

We will tackle the following questions:

  1.  How is Suicide Prevention is a social justice issue?
  2. What social factors potentially impact suicide risk in the area that you serve?
  3. What are some of the barriers to suicide prevention?
  4. What are ways the macro social work/social work community can collaborate with the suicide prevention community?

This chat is a collaboration between Macro Social Work Tweet Chat (@OfficialMacroSW represented by @KarenZgoda) and the Suicide Prevention on Social Media Tweet Chat (@spsmchat represented by Sean Erreger, LCSW @StuckonSW) Thanks again to Dr. Siobahn O’Neill (@ProfSiobahnOn) for the inspiration and joining us in Northern Ireland.

To join us please follow/use the hashtag #MacroSW on Saturday March 26, 2016 at 1:00pm EST / 6:00pm GMT

Sources:

Let’s Celebrate #SWMonth Heroes! #MacroSW 3/3 at 9pm EST

March 1, 2016
swmonthlogo2016

Image courtesy of Rhonda Ragsdale

In the 116th year of our profession, there are more than 600,000 social workers in the United States that likely passed through one of our 235 schools of social work. In fact, CSWE accredits close to 800 social work programs and many schools have both BSW and MSW accreditations. One of the reasons why social work has been called “the 21st century law degree” is because it embraces every possible super power. Need to navigate the patchwork quilt we call our health care system? Call a social worker. Need to pull together legislation to that protects the most vulnerable Americans? Call a social worker. Need to mend a broken relationship, heal wounds from childhood abuse and neglect, or overcome the fears standing in the way of becoming the best person you can be? Call a social worker. If social workers were to dress up like the superheroes they are and stand on the steps outside of ComiCon, they would probably look something like this:

For #SWMonth 2016, #MacroSW is partnering with some of the most important and influential social work organizations on social media. We are joining our wondertwin powers on Twitter to celebrate and promote social work. Our team of collaborating superheroes this month include:

Our chat questions are:

  1. Why is #SWMonth important?
  2. What do you wish more people appreciated about social workers?
  3. With which industries should social works develop more effective partnerships?
  4. Who is your social work hero?/ What social worker inspires you?
  5. What is your favorite social work superpower?
  6. This Social Work Month, about which of these are you most excited?

Theories of Human Behavior || focus & main concepts

February 17, 2016

Fantastic HBSE resource!

 

Social Work Scrapbook

Flamingo-Swizzles

Flamingo-Swizzles

Flamingo-Swizzles

Flamingo-Swizzles

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Grand Accomplishments in #SocialWork: #MacroSW Chat 2/4 at 9pm EST

February 2, 2016

Update: Chat archive now available!

Source: Grand Accomplishments in #SocialWork: #MacroSW Chat 2/4 at 9pm EST

According to lead author Michael Sherraden at Washington University of St. LouisGrand Accomplishments in Social Work describes a number of achievements during the last century including protection and deinstitutionalization of dependent children, the expansion of foster care and adoption, reductions in infant mortality, end of child labor, expansion of civil and women’s rights and many others. Were you aware that social work pioneer Jane Addams won the Nobel Peace Prize, the second woman to receive this prize? Samuel L. Jackson, Alice Walker, and Suze Orman all have social work degrees. Social worker and current Senator Barbara Mikulski has also been the longest serving woman Senator in U.S. history. During World War II, social worker Irena Sendler rescued 2,500 Jewish children in Poland as part of underground organization Żegota. Public health worker, social worker, and whistleblower Peter Buxton helped stop the unethical Tuskegee Study.

Join us as we discuss some of these grand accomplishments of social work practice. Here are some questions we will address:

  1. What do you think the field’s biggest accomplishments have been?
  2. Where is social work on its way to big things/big accomplishments?
  3. In what ways have Social Work’s Grand Accomplishments affirmed your commitment to social work practice and research?
  4. Which of the Grand Challenges do you think we have the best chance of turning in Grand Accomplishments in the next decade?
  5. What evolving skill set are you developing that will be needed  to sustain our profession’s future work?

Additional Sources:

 

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