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Our Advocates, Ourselves: Building Micro Macro Common Ground. #MacroSW Chat 4/23 9PM EST

April 20, 2015

Originally posted on #macrosw:

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Join us for a chat with guest expert Michael Brooks as we discuss building common ground between micro and macro social work practice. Our chat partner will be Michael Brooks, MSW, BCD, the Director, Policy and Business Development for the Center for Clinical Social Work. The Center is the parent organization for the American Board of Examiners in Clinical Social Work, which issues the Board Certified Diplomate Credential in Clinical Social Work (ABE), and the American Clinical Social Work Association (ACSWA), the first online, social media-based association for clinical social work. He also maintains a small private psychotherapy, EAP and consulting practice in the city of Sonoma, CA. He served on the Board of Directors for the Employee Assistance Society of North America (EASNA), from 2005-2011, is currently on the Board of Directors for ACMHA: The College for Behavioral Health Leadership,  is a member of the California…

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Client Confidentiality in the Age of Social Media

March 13, 2015

I had the pleasure of presenting at Community Services of Greater Brockton on March 4, 2015 to talk about client confidentiality in the age of social media. My colleague, Melanie Sage, has done related work and graciously allowed me to repost her related infographic. Here are some talking points from the Brockton presentation.

General Talking Points:

  • It is not a matter of if we use technology, it is a matter of how we use technology
  • Social worker voices tend to be missing from conversations and decisions about tech
  • Confusion and fear about how to proceed with technology in practice drives avoidance not solutions
    • This does a disservice to our clients, who may expect practitioners and services to meet them where they are with technology
  • We run the risk of being culturally incompetent with clients
    • How can we practice effectively if we don’t understand significant aspects of client’s lives, and this includes technology?

Social Media:

  • Social media allows us to have asynchronous, non-geographically bound conversations, interactions, and connections with others
  • These interactions can reach more people than ever before, and typically publicly archived
  • We can advertise our services, provide the most up to date information for clients, and share research findings related to our practice, etc.
  • Social media presents opportunities and challenges for social workers
  • To avoid or lessen complications, develop a social media policy

In terms of confidentiality, the following guidelines from the Online Therapy Institute Ethical Framework for the Use of Social Media by Mental Health Professionals are helpful:

  • Be upfront about appropriate methods of contact (i.e., text messages, email, public messaging)
  • Provide the best level of protection for client data
  • Recognize client concerns and be upfront about the challenges and risks involved with security and privacy. For example, if you email me I may have no control if my account is hacked, but here is how I protect your information as much as possible and what I will do if there is a problem. (Source).
  • Not discuss confidential information on social media
  • Be upfront about avoiding dual relationships on social media
    • Have a policy in place if a client discovers on social media mutual friends, interests, or cultural groups with you. For example, I do not friend or follow current students on social media. If students find me, I welcome their conversation and dialogue, and questions.
  • Do not ask for reviews on consumer review sites, and do not respond on consumer reviews in any way confirming whether someone is or was a therapy client

References:

#MacroSW Chat 2/12 9PM EST – Everything You Wanted to Know About Macro Social Work But Were Afraid to Ask

February 10, 2015

Update 2/12/15: Chat archive available!

Well, everything about Macro Social Work that can fit into an hour of respectful dialogue and synchronous Twitter conversation.

We will cover:

  • What is macro social work?
  • How can I learn about macro social work practice?
  • How can I connect with others doing macro social work?
  • What inspires you about macro social work?
  • What do you wish others knew about macro social work practice?

Resources:

#MacroSW Chats is collaboration Between the Association for Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA), University at Buffalo School of Social Work, the Network for Social Work Management (NSWM), and Karen Zgoda (Instructor at Bridgewater State University). The chats are held on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month at 9:00 PM EST/ 6:00 PM PST. For more info check out: https://macrosw.wordpress.com

Understanding the Process of Interagency Collaboration and Its Long-Term Effectiveness

January 16, 2015

Folks, here is my presentation from the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) conference held in New Orleans, January 2015.

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Understanding the Process of Interagency Collaboration and Its Long-Term Effectiveness

Abstract: Background and Purpose: Charlestown Connects was an interagency collaboration in the neighborhood of Charlestown, Massachusetts. The Charlestown Connects program was an ongoing, formalized partnership between the City of Boston, neighborhood agencies, and other community agencies to improve community outcomes via interagency collaboration. In response to a request from the Office of the Mayor of Boston, the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work (BCGSSW) agreed to provide guidance on the evaluation of the program. This Phase I evaluation documented the structure, process, and implementation of Charlestown Connects. Phase I data collection was completed in 2008 and the evaluation itself was completed in 2010.

While limited social work research has explored interagency collaborations, there remains a persistent gap in the literature in terms of assessing interagency collaboration processes, outcomes and long-term effects. Building on the Phase I evaluation, this poster on the Phase II evaluation helps address these research gaps by expanding our understanding of interagency collaboration in terms of inputs, processes, and long-term community outcomes. This study informs social workers and others who contribute to community well-being infrastructure of the benefits, if any, of developing interagency collaborations. In addition, given the current economic climate, this research may provide important and timely interagency collaboration guidelines for social work practitioners.

Methods: Interviews with the original eight Charlestown Connects program stakeholders were conducted and observations of community meetings sponsored by Charlestown Connects were observed. Interviews explored stakeholder relationships to Charlestown Connects, program success and areas to improve, and program impact. Meeting observations tallied interagency collaboration processes in accordance with the study’s theoretical framework. Both interviews and meeting observations were transcribed and coded using HyperRESEARCH qualitative software using theoretical clustering framed by the study’s theoretical framework, thematic analysis, recurring themes from the first evaluation, and long-term factors that have emerged from the current evaluation..

Findings: This study has shown that Charlestown Connects enhanced communication infrastructure for community agencies while positively impacting perceptions of quality of life among Charlestown residents who were aware of Charlestown Connects. In the short-term, Charlestown Connects made noticeable, positive changes in service delivery issues with the City of Boston. In the long-term, it helped rebuild the communication infrastructure among participating agencies in Charlestown.

Conclusion and Implications: This study provides guidance on improving interagency collaborations for social workers and others engaging in community work. Evidence from the previous evaluation and the current study suggest that the program coordinator took on functions and responsibilities of a community social worker in his role coordinating Charlestown Connects, thus reasserting the important role macro social work may play in leading community infrastructure rebuilding efforts in the future.

View this document on Scribd

2014 in Review

December 30, 2014

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 10,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

#FergusonSyllabus Resources

November 29, 2014

Here are some resources culled from Twitter hashtag #FergusonSyllabus:

Igniting the Fire: Creating and Sustaining Innovation in Macro Social Work Practice #MacroSW 10/23, 9pm EST

October 21, 2014

Igniting the Fire: Creating and Sustaining Innovation in Macro Social Work Practice #MacroSW 10/23, 9pm EST.

mozartspicture_zpsec056ea3Update 10/23/14: Chat archive here!
Folks, join us for a special chat hosted by Karen Zgoda (@karenzgoda) on creating and sustaining innovation with guest expert Mozart Guerrier (@mgspeaks). Mozart is community practitioner focusing on supporting grassroots community leaders to address health disparities. He speaks on storytelling and social innovation conferences at MIT, Brown, TEDxSyracuse, and TEDxUtica and contributes his ideas on social innovation and impact to Social Enterprise Alliance and Stanford Social Innovation Review. He has experience starting and being a member of multiple social impact startups.

 

Here’s a preview:

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Discussion Questions:
  1. How do we build macro social work innovation?
  2. How do we build macro social work in a sustainable way?
    1. Lots of individual shops, but not working together
    2. Even when working together, where is quality?
  3. How can macro social workers become more influential? How can we lead the conversations?
  4. How can social workers make an impact NOW?
Resources:

#MacroSW chats is a live Twitter chat the focuses on macro social work practice. It takes place on the 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month at 9:00 PM EST. The chat is a collaboration between the Association of Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA), University of Southern California – School of Social Work, the University at Buffalo – School of Social Work, The Network for Social Work Management (NSWM), and Karen Zgoda, Instructor at Bridgewater State University.

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