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#FergusonSyllabus Resources

November 29, 2014

Here are some resources culled from Twitter hashtag #FergusonSyllabus:

Igniting the Fire: Creating and Sustaining Innovation in Macro Social Work Practice #MacroSW 10/23, 9pm EST

October 21, 2014

Igniting the Fire: Creating and Sustaining Innovation in Macro Social Work Practice #MacroSW 10/23, 9pm EST.

mozartspicture_zpsec056ea3Update 10/23/14: Chat archive here!
Folks, join us for a special chat hosted by Karen Zgoda (@karenzgoda) on creating and sustaining innovation with guest expert Mozart Guerrier (@mgspeaks). Mozart is community practitioner focusing on supporting grassroots community leaders to address health disparities. He speaks on storytelling and social innovation conferences at MIT, Brown, TEDxSyracuse, and TEDxUtica and contributes his ideas on social innovation and impact to Social Enterprise Alliance and Stanford Social Innovation Review. He has experience starting and being a member of multiple social impact startups.

 

Here’s a preview:

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Discussion Questions:
  1. How do we build macro social work innovation?
  2. How do we build macro social work in a sustainable way?
    1. Lots of individual shops, but not working together
    2. Even when working together, where is quality?
  3. How can macro social workers become more influential? How can we lead the conversations?
  4. How can social workers make an impact NOW?
Resources:

#MacroSW chats is a live Twitter chat the focuses on macro social work practice. It takes place on the 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month at 9:00 PM EST. The chat is a collaboration between the Association of Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA), University of Southern California – School of Social Work, the University at Buffalo – School of Social Work, The Network for Social Work Management (NSWM), and Karen Zgoda, Instructor at Bridgewater State University.

domesticshelters.org Launches to Help Millions of Abuse Victims Find Help Faster, Easier Than Before

September 1, 2014

Its_LiveThis is an amazing resource! Please consider helping to spread the word:

Site Launches to Help Millions of Abuse Victims Find Help Faster, Easier Than Before | DomesticShelters.

First Online Searchable Domestic Violence Provider Database in U.S.

August 26, 2014

Online you’ll find plenty of information about domestic violence. That’s not a problem. What is a challenge is trying to find the right help quickly and easily. Search results often reveal disparate shelter sites, help blogs, opportunistic ad-driven sites with outdated data, and paid placements by attorneys. The new website domesticshelters.org is changing this reality by providing consumers the first online searchable domestic violence provider database.

“The great news is that there are many good people, organizations and providers trying to help, and in fact, helping,” said Sylvia Torralba, membership director for the National Coalition of Domestic Violence (NCADV) which has partnered with Theresa’s Fund to develop and launch the site. “What we’re doing is aggregating an ocean of information into a single place.”

More than just aggregating information, the organizers of domesticshelters.org tirelessly spent six months unearthing and identifying 3,001 domestic violence provider organizations in the U.S., and then gathering up to 156 data points on each.

The result is the largest database of its kind ever created, and importantly, the ability for domesticshelters.org language and service preferences, and with a single mouse click, instantly see the most proximate, relevant opportunities for help.

“If you conduct a search in this area, you’ll often not find all of the local providers listed on page one. Some providers don’t even have a web presence,” said Chris McMurry, a marketing and technology entrepreneur and director of Theresa’s Fund, who notes that the overwhelming majority of consumers begin their decision making process with an online search.

“We will be fixing that by moving the exploration of the provider community to the forefront of search results, and then by presenting visitors of domesticshelters.org with standardized data on the providers that allows people to make comparisons and more educated decisions.”

Generally speaking, for each provider there will be contact information excepting confidential locations, languages spoken, populations and geographies served, hours of operation, vacancy rates, and detail on 46 different types of services that may be offered.

Importantly, provider organizations will be able to self-administer their organization’s profile on the website, updating fundamental information as it evolves and adding custom content to enhance the comprehensiveness and attractiveness of their operation and offerings.

According to Google more than 3,000,000 searches are conducted per month for information related to domestic violence, and most often related to seeking help.

The website will be optimized for smartphone and tablet use, recognizing that consumers are increasingly using their devices to conduct searches. Indeed, the number of local mobile searches is expected to exceed desktop searches by 2015, according to eMarketer.

“With some 36,000,000 million searches a year in just the U.S. on the topic of domestic violence, domesticshelters.org is an overdue and much-needed concept that may help more people than any other service ever offered in this space, and may help save lives because it will be so easy, accessible and fast to use,” added Torralba.

The website will also publish and supply helpful information about domestic violence, in addition to the provider database. Providers will be able to gain access to the entire database behind the website in order to better coordinate inter-agency referrals and services.

About NCADV

The survivor led and survivor focused National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) has worked for more than thirty-five years to end violence against women by raising awareness and educating the public about the effects of domestic abuse. Our work includes developing and sustaining ground-breaking public policy at the national level aimed at ending violence; assisting the 2,000+ urban and rural shelters and programs at the local, state, and regional levels of the nation in the programming they offer to victims seeking safety and assistance; and offering programming that empowers and supports the long-term health and safety of victims of domestic violence. Currently, our constituency encompasses more than 80,000 programs, survivors, advocates, and allied individuals and is growing daily. Learn more about us at: www.ncadv.org.

About Theresa’s Fund

Theresa’s Fund is a private family foundation started in 1992 by Preston V. McMurry, Jr. that has helped to change the landscape of domestic violence services in Arizona through grant making, board development and fundraising that has helped to generate more than $49 million in donations for Arizona-based organizations such as East Valley Child Crisis Center, Sojourner Center, Florence Crittenden, Emerge, UMOM, and West Valley Child Crisis Center. It developed the domesticshelters.org concept as a way to expand its reach to people across the U.S.

Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics (JSWVE) Term Paper Contest

August 7, 2014

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(Editor’s note: I am a copy editor at JSWVE)

The Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics (JSWVE) is sponsoring a term paper contest.

The term papers will be collected by the JSWVE editorial board and judged by a board of professionals not associated with JSWVE. Winning papers will be published in the Fall 2015 issue of the Journal.

Details for the contest are:

  • Must have a central theme of social work values or social work ethics
  • Must be written as an MSW or BSW student (student may have graduated)
  • Must be nominated by a faculty member (the nominating professor’s name will be published)
  • Must follow the general manuscript submission guidelines found at
    http://www.jswve.org/images/PDFs/jswvemanuscriptformat1207.pdf
  • Must be in APA citation style (except NO headers, NO footers, and NO page numbers)
  • Deadline for submission: May 15, 2015
  • Paper must be submitted by email to smarson@nc.rr.com with a copy sent to
    donnadanddennisv@gmail.com
  • Winning term papers will be published in The Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics in the fall
    issues of 2015.
  • Judges will be professionals who are NOT associated with the JSWVE editorial board

Judging criteria will include:

  • Demonstration of Critical Thinking
  • Relevance to Theme of Social Work Values and Ethics
  • Relevance and Interest of Essay to Social Work Students, Practitioners, and/or Academics
  • Coverage of the Topic
  • Use of Relevant, Scholarly Citations
  • Coherence (flow of ideas)
  • Quality of Writing (literary competence, spelling, grammar, organization)
  • Originality (of topic, ideas, and/or arguments)

 

Evaluating Practice: #MacroSW Twitter Chat 7/10 at 9pm EST

July 10, 2014

miracle_cartoon

What are best practices in evaluating practice? What have you found to be helpful in integrating evaluation into your practice? What do you need to be better at evaluating practice? Join us as we discuss evaluating practice and share best practices!

Chat discussion questions:

  1. What are the current goals of the program? What does the literature say about this phenomenon in terms of program intervention?
  2. What kinds of data will evaluators need? What is readily available? Are government statistics relevant, for example? Does the agency keep data that might be useful? With whom might evaluators want to gather information? Agency directors? Middle-level staff? Clients?
  3. What type of design makes the most sense and why?
  4. What type of data collection tools would be most appropriate?
  5. How will the evaluation address culture and social contexts?
  6. What limitations will this evaluation present? What obstacles might evaluators encounter and how would one counter these obstacles?
  7. Having already identified the primary stakeholders, how would one disseminate the results of the program evaluation?

 

Engaging Modern Social Workers in Community Practice: #macrosw 4/10 at 9pm EST

April 7, 2014

“Collaboration is an unnatural action among non-consenting adults.” Eugene Bardach (as cited in Chever, Clifton, & Hogan, 2005)

For our next #macrosw Twitter chat, we’ll be focusing on collaboration as an example of macro social work practice. As you may know, I conducted a long-term, qualitative evaluation of an interagency collaboration program called Charlestown Connects for my dissertation. The Charlestown Connects program sought to improve community outcomes via interagency collaboration between local government and nonprofit agencies. Building on a prior evaluation, this study examined how the processes involved in the Charlestown Connects interagency collaboration evolved and long-term intervention effects. Using qualitative interviews with program stakeholders and observations of community meetings sponsored by Charlestown Connects, this study provides guidance on improving interagency collaborations for social workers and others engaging in community work. Major findings include the impact of interagency collaboration relationship building, an examination of factors and processes that helped grow and sustain the collaboration, and implications for the role macro social work may play in leading community infrastructure rebuilding efforts in the future.

Questions for discussion:

  1. How can macro social workers make an impact in our communities?
  2. How do we engage modern social workers in community practice work?
  3. How can social workers help rebuild community communication infrastructure?
  4. What resources do you need to get more involved in community work?

Resources:

Chat partners:

UPDATE: Complete chat archive here! Here are some chat highlights:

 UPDATE: More chat highlights here:

TWITTER #MacroSW Chat – Jobs gleaned 4-10-14

The Next Seven Weeks, c/o Rodney Dangerfield

March 22, 2014

Between resubmitting dissertation revisions (for those of you counting at home it has now been a year of back and forth edits…ugh) and working five jobs this semester, life RAM and morale are pretty low these days. It will likely stay this way for the next seven weeks when teaching two courses will end. Couldn’t have said it better myself:

RIP Rodney!

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