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Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics (JSWVE) Term Paper Contest

August 7, 2014

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(Editor’s note: I am a copy editor at JSWVE)

The Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics (JSWVE) is sponsoring a term paper contest.

The term papers will be collected by the JSWVE editorial board and judged by a board of professionals not associated with JSWVE. Winning papers will be published in the Fall 2015 issue of the Journal.

Details for the contest are:

  • Must have a central theme of social work values or social work ethics
  • Must be written as an MSW or BSW student (student may have graduated)
  • Must be nominated by a faculty member (the nominating professor’s name will be published)
  • Must follow the general manuscript submission guidelines found at
    http://www.jswve.org/images/PDFs/jswvemanuscriptformat1207.pdf
  • Must be in APA citation style (except NO headers, NO footers, and NO page numbers)
  • Deadline for submission: May 15, 2015
  • Paper must be submitted by email to smarson@nc.rr.com with a copy sent to
    donnadanddennisv@gmail.com
  • Winning term papers will be published in The Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics in the fall
    issues of 2015.
  • Judges will be professionals who are NOT associated with the JSWVE editorial board

Judging criteria will include:

  • Demonstration of Critical Thinking
  • Relevance to Theme of Social Work Values and Ethics
  • Relevance and Interest of Essay to Social Work Students, Practitioners, and/or Academics
  • Coverage of the Topic
  • Use of Relevant, Scholarly Citations
  • Coherence (flow of ideas)
  • Quality of Writing (literary competence, spelling, grammar, organization)
  • Originality (of topic, ideas, and/or arguments)

 

Evaluating Practice: #MacroSW Twitter Chat 7/10 at 9pm EST

July 10, 2014

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What are best practices in evaluating practice? What have you found to be helpful in integrating evaluation into your practice? What do you need to be better at evaluating practice? Join us as we discuss evaluating practice and share best practices!

Chat discussion questions:

  1. What are the current goals of the program? What does the literature say about this phenomenon in terms of program intervention?
  2. What kinds of data will evaluators need? What is readily available? Are government statistics relevant, for example? Does the agency keep data that might be useful? With whom might evaluators want to gather information? Agency directors? Middle-level staff? Clients?
  3. What type of design makes the most sense and why?
  4. What type of data collection tools would be most appropriate?
  5. How will the evaluation address culture and social contexts?
  6. What limitations will this evaluation present? What obstacles might evaluators encounter and how would one counter these obstacles?
  7. Having already identified the primary stakeholders, how would one disseminate the results of the program evaluation?

 

Engaging Modern Social Workers in Community Practice: #macrosw 4/10 at 9pm EST

April 7, 2014

“Collaboration is an unnatural action among non-consenting adults.” Eugene Bardach (as cited in Chever, Clifton, & Hogan, 2005)

For our next #macrosw Twitter chat, we’ll be focusing on collaboration as an example of macro social work practice. As you may know, I conducted a long-term, qualitative evaluation of an interagency collaboration program called Charlestown Connects for my dissertation. The Charlestown Connects program sought to improve community outcomes via interagency collaboration between local government and nonprofit agencies. Building on a prior evaluation, this study examined how the processes involved in the Charlestown Connects interagency collaboration evolved and long-term intervention effects. Using qualitative interviews with program stakeholders and observations of community meetings sponsored by Charlestown Connects, this study provides guidance on improving interagency collaborations for social workers and others engaging in community work. Major findings include the impact of interagency collaboration relationship building, an examination of factors and processes that helped grow and sustain the collaboration, and implications for the role macro social work may play in leading community infrastructure rebuilding efforts in the future.

Questions for discussion:

  1. How can macro social workers make an impact in our communities?
  2. How do we engage modern social workers in community practice work?
  3. How can social workers help rebuild community communication infrastructure?
  4. What resources do you need to get more involved in community work?

Resources:

Chat partners:

UPDATE: Complete chat archive here! Here are some chat highlights:

 UPDATE: More chat highlights here:

TWITTER #MacroSW Chat – Jobs gleaned 4-10-14

The Next Seven Weeks, c/o Rodney Dangerfield

March 22, 2014

Between resubmitting dissertation revisions (for those of you counting at home it has now been a year of back and forth edits…ugh) and working five jobs this semester, life RAM and morale are pretty low these days. It will likely stay this way for the next seven weeks when teaching two courses will end. Couldn’t have said it better myself:

RIP Rodney!

#MacroSW Twitter Chats Start Tonight at 9pm EST!

March 13, 2014

YOU’RE INVITED!

THIS WEEK: Discussion of the Rothmann Report. As described by Rachel West:

Over the past year I have written often about the findings in the Rothman Report, which you can read below. The report found that macro social work is in trouble. Schools of social work are increasingly cutting out macro focused courses, there are few macro field placements available, and faculty and administration are actively discouraging students from pursuing community practice work.

Following the publication of the report, ACOSA formed a commission that was tasked with expanding on the research in the report and coming up with solutions to the concerns raised. Recently the Congressional Research Institute for Social Work and Policy (CRISP) wrote an article about the Rothman Commision. You can find that article here.

View this document on Scribd

UPDATE:  Read the chat transcript here: View the story “#MacroSW Chat Recap (3/13/14)” on Storify

The Teachers

February 24, 2014

Some respect, c/o The Teachers:

All of you former students: you did not design curricula, plan lessons, attend faculty meetings, assess papers, design rubrics, create exams, prepare report cards, and monitor attendance. You did not tutor students, review rough drafts, and create study questions. You did not assign homework. You did not write daily lesson objectives on the white board. You did not write poems of the week on the white board. You did not write homework on the white board. You did not learn to write legibly on the white board while simultaneously making sure that none of your students threw a chair out a window.

You did not design lessons that succeeded. You did not design lessons that failed.

My favorite teaching moment from last week:

In both of the research methods classes I am teaching this semester, we are operationalizing variables, a phrase I have trouble saying out loud properly because I  get nervous sometimes while teaching and seriously, operationalizing is a crazy word to try and say. Basically when operationalizing a variable, we indicate how we define the variable and identify indicators so it can be tested or measured. I put social conformity on the board and asked the class to operationalize it. From the corner of the room a student yelled out:

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Bravo. Brilliant! And for good measure, a friend recently gave me this shirt. ❤ Super-psyched to be teaching this semester!

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2013 in Review

January 6, 2014

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 23,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 9 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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